Business stories require numbers


DUNS-number1

A good reporter/friend of mine, Doreen Hemlock of the Sun-Sentinel, presented at the June 2013 meeting of the Gold Coast PR Council.

Although I couldn’t attend, (I was in Chicago at the American Business Awards), my colleagues were there, and let me know that Doreen mentioned me by name with regard to pitching a good business story. Thanks, Doreen!

PR tip #2: One of the main points she made is key to any good business story: numbers. Business stories require numbers.

Even though Doreen covers the non-profit world with a focus on philanthropy, her stories are still built around financials.

The reason my public relations pitch about the progress and impact of Feeding South Florida was of interest to her was because I could back up my client’s work with real numbers, i.e. pounds of food distributed, number of residents suffering from food insecurity and budget numbers from FSF, such as revenue raised via special campaigns and costs associated with its growth.

If you are not willing or able to provide a writer with substantiated numbers, then don’t bother a business reporter. Talk to the society editor, lifestyle writer or community news editor, but leave the business reporter alone.

Yes, it’s a coveted spot to be in the Business section but read it. You’ll find that most stories feature financials to indicate a trend, progression or decline. If you don’t have the right equipment, you can’t play in this game.